Category Archives: Conservation

From The Pasta Princess Ideas for Beets and Labels

From The Pasta Princess Ideas for Beets and Labels

Right now I’m using beet juice to dye washcloths that I have knit and crocheted. I found this great article about another great idea for beets. I hope you enjoy it.

 

What to do with all those beets – try canning some Pickled Beets and make Your Own Beautiful Canning Labels!

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Do you have a lot of beets in your garden or do you just love pickled beets?  Try canning them.  It’s super easy and you’ll have delicious pickled beets in the winter.  I love almost all vegetables, and although I like beets, I could take them or leave them.  But … pickled beets that is entirely another story!  I could eat them by the jar full.  I loved my mother’s pickled beets and it’s been years since I’ve tasted devoured them.  I don’t know why I never tried canning beets myself, but I am so glad I finally did.  I’ll have to save a jar for my mother …although, they won’t be quite as good as hers! Read the rest of this entry

The Heirloom Life Gardener by Jere and Emilee Gettle

The Heirloom Life Gardener by Jere and Emilee Gettle

It’s not a secret that I heart all things Baker Creek. A couple of weeks ago I was able to get the book by Jere and Emilee Gettle called, The Heirloom Life Gardener The Baker Creek Way of Growing Your Own Food Easily and Naturally. I’ve been pouring over it and I must say, this is a book you’re going to want to get!

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Throwback Thursday: Zinnia

Throwback Thursday: Zinnia
zinnia bouquet

Zinnia=what’s not to love?

Recently, someone asked me if the Zinnia is my favorite flower. Not really, but one would think so. Don’t get me wrong, I love the Zinnia. Roses are my favorite flower…or maybe tulips…honestly I would be hard pressed to pick just one as a favorite. I really love flowers. I think if I could only have one type for the rest of my life, I’d pick hydrangea. Having said all that, I do love the zinnia.

What’s not to love? They’re easy to grow, love to bloom and come in so many shapes, sizes and colors, there’s really something for everyone.

My mom was not a “yard” type person. She didn’t garden or fuss with the yard. It was always tidy but that was about all. Except…she did grow zinnias and sometimes snapdragons. I don’t recall marigolds, but they may have been in there somewhere, oh, and it seems like some years there might be an injection or two of petunias. Read the rest of this entry

The Time is Now! Fall Planting Must be Planned Now

The Time is Now! Fall Planting Must be Planned Now

Now is the time to be setting in motion what you’ll be growing in your fall garden. It is time to plan your fall planting.

Fall leaves in Texas

Texas in the fall

If you wait until summer wanes, it will be too late.

Jack B Little Pumpkins

Jack B Little Pumpkins

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Are You Plugged In?

Are You Plugged In?

Today I had to update plugins. Not an unusual or exciting occasion. Certainly not worth writing about. However, it did cause me to look particularly long at the word plugin and realize, it’s not a word.

I mean, it is a word, spell check doesn’t even blink at it. But really, plugin, is not a word. It’s like the h in humble, we never voted to change it to umble, but somehow, that’s what it is. (Except at my house, where the h gets used each and every time it is meant to be used. I mean,  arry the enderson as a pulled amstring makes you sound like you’re doing a bad cockney impression. Dun’t it?)

All that to say this, today is shameless plug day! Here’s what I read, what I love, what I’m thinking about. I know you wanted to know. If you love them as well, tell them the Paisley Carrot sent you. I’m giving you four from each category because four is my favorite number. Read the rest of this entry

The Summer Is Here!

The Summer Is Here!

Today is the first day of summer! So happy summer! It’s the longest day of the year (or the shortest if you live on the other side of the world).

Summer is…

  • a time for home made and carted popsicles.
  • swimming pools or swimming holes.
  • firefly lanterns and sleep outs.
  • lemonade on the porch and watermelon in the fridge.
  • secrets with friends.
  • daisy chains and banana bikes.
  • pirates and princesses.
  • grandparents and cousins.

It’s the first day. What are you going to do with your summer?

Make it paisley!~KeriAnne

Reblogged from Live Nakedly

Reblogged from Live Nakedly

 

Good Dirt: Small Farm, Big Dreams

This was a great article I wanted to share with you. Project Garden Share is on my mind a lot these days. I hope you’ll consider getting involved in your area. Have a paisley Wednesday!~KeriAnne

 

All photos courtesy of Dan Soulsby/Soulsby Farm.

“I would find it hard to believe that anyone would be ‘for’ GMO’s. Why would you be? Why would anyone (even if they’re not a health nut) want to put something with the words ‘genetically modified’ into their bodies?”  Dan Soulsby worked in Hollywood, but dreamed of returning to his native Ohio to start a farm.  According toThe Soulsby Farm’s website, his opportunity came during the 2007-2008 economic downturn that left him without his job and the impetus to move.  Running his “very small farm” of under two acres with his wife Mindy, these two graphic designers by day are hoping not only to grow their own food, but to bring properly grown harvests to those most in need in their community via a non-profit, Project Garden Share.

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Throwback Thursday: Cornflower

Throwback Thursday: Cornflower

Last year I had one garden bed at the side of the house that was designated for winter squash, but it never got planted.

I realized that I really don’t like staying too long on that side of the house because it is near the road.

Seaweed or Woads, 2 months old.

I have this silly cat, Woads, that was abandoned by his mom at three days old, that I subsequently, bottle fed and raised. Now, when I’m outside, he’s right at my feet. If I’m on that side of the house, he’s too close to the road, because when he gets scared, he climbs me.

Now do you see the dilemma?

Every time a car goes by, I become Pepito from Madeline. (If you don’t understand this, you really must read the Madeline books by Ludwig Bemelmans. Go now, I’ll wait.)

So, this year, I tripled the size of the bed and planted flowers. The idea was to be able to attract pollinators, beautify the public side of the house and have a bed that I could plant and let be. It was such a good plan.

Three days after I planted, we had torrential rains. While the rest of the beds loved the rain, the flower bed with it’s tiny seeds, took a beating. The result?

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Making Hay

Making Hay

The title of this article is deceiving as I am not going to talk about making hay. This is what you would want to do when the sun is shining.

Instead, I want to talk to you about what to do when it’s raining, especially if it hasn’t been raining enough.

When we moved to Tyler, almost exactly one year ago, we were told that the area was having the most severe drought in a hundred years. But, it really didn’t seem that “droughty”.  There were trees that seemed fine, the grass was a little frayed but not dead, and it wasn’t until August that we were officially issued a “burn ban” in our county.

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Stuff You Missed in Botany: Parasitic Wasps (and other beneficial insects)

Stuff You Missed in Botany: Parasitic Wasps (and other beneficial insects)

I’ve barely been in the garden this week, but today is cool and gorgeous; so this may be a short post.

A reader wrote me to ask what a parasitic wasp was and how, as I had suggested, they could make them their friends? What a great question to answer on Botany day!

These little guys are very small, sometimes 1/100th to 3/4’s of an inch long. That’s small. So small, in fact that they often go unnoticed, to humans.

Trichogramma Wasp, Not a Mosquito

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