Category Archives: Seeds

The Heirloom Life Gardener by Jere and Emilee Gettle

The Heirloom Life Gardener by Jere and Emilee Gettle

It’s not a secret that I heart all things Baker Creek. A couple of weeks ago I was able to get the book by Jere and Emilee Gettle called, The Heirloom Life Gardener The Baker Creek Way of Growing Your Own Food Easily and Naturally. I’ve been pouring over it and I must say, this is a book you’re going to want to get!

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Throwback Thursday: Zinnia

Throwback Thursday: Zinnia
zinnia bouquet

Zinnia=what’s not to love?

Recently, someone asked me if the Zinnia is my favorite flower. Not really, but one would think so. Don’t get me wrong, I love the Zinnia. Roses are my favorite flower…or maybe tulips…honestly I would be hard pressed to pick just one as a favorite. I really love flowers. I think if I could only have one type for the rest of my life, I’d pick hydrangea. Having said all that, I do love the zinnia.

What’s not to love? They’re easy to grow, love to bloom and come in so many shapes, sizes and colors, there’s really something for everyone.

My mom was not a “yard” type person. She didn’t garden or fuss with the yard. It was always tidy but that was about all. Except…she did grow zinnias and sometimes snapdragons. I don’t recall marigolds, but they may have been in there somewhere, oh, and it seems like some years there might be an injection or two of petunias. Read the rest of this entry

Are You Plugged In?

Are You Plugged In?

Today I had to update plugins. Not an unusual or exciting occasion. Certainly not worth writing about. However, it did cause me to look particularly long at the word plugin and realize, it’s not a word.

I mean, it is a word, spell check doesn’t even blink at it. But really, plugin, is not a word. It’s like the h in humble, we never voted to change it to umble, but somehow, that’s what it is. (Except at my house, where the h gets used each and every time it is meant to be used. I mean,  arry the enderson as a pulled amstring makes you sound like you’re doing a bad cockney impression. Dun’t it?)

All that to say this, today is shameless plug day! Here’s what I read, what I love, what I’m thinking about. I know you wanted to know. If you love them as well, tell them the Paisley Carrot sent you. I’m giving you four from each category because four is my favorite number. Read the rest of this entry

The Summer Is Here!

The Summer Is Here!

Today is the first day of summer! So happy summer! It’s the longest day of the year (or the shortest if you live on the other side of the world).

Summer is…

  • a time for home made and carted popsicles.
  • swimming pools or swimming holes.
  • firefly lanterns and sleep outs.
  • lemonade on the porch and watermelon in the fridge.
  • secrets with friends.
  • daisy chains and banana bikes.
  • pirates and princesses.
  • grandparents and cousins.

It’s the first day. What are you going to do with your summer?

Make it paisley!~KeriAnne

Totally Terrific Tuesday

Totally Terrific Tuesday

I woke up this morning and decided it was going to be a totally terrific Tuesday. I was kind of sore, kind of headachy, and kind of blah, but I didn’t want to let that hold me back, so I didn’t.

I got up, got dressed, drank coffee and went out to the garden. Yesterday I planted twelve new cucumbers, but I gave out before I could do all the finishing up that I usually do. This morning I went out and sprinkled ground eggshell on all of the new mounds that will be my lovely cucumber plants soon.

I checked the new melons, they’re happy in their new bed. The Vert Grimmpant and the Jelly Melons already have flowers on them and the White Wonder Watermelon, started from seed just four days ago, is already about two inches tall. We had a good soaking rain the night I planted the melons, followed by three days of warm sunshine, which, no doubt, is the cause for all that melon happiness. Well, that and my gorgeous black compost from last year that they’re now wallowing in. = )

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To the Garden We’ll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

To the Garden We’ll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

The beds are in…the beds are in! 20 beds all tucked in, one Parsnip, all tuckered out!

This is the before picture of the front four beds.

Today was the first day schedules meshed with the Parsnip, my Father-in-law and his tiller.

It could not have been more perfect. Around seven the Parsnip started tilling the two beds that will have flowers around the driveway. By 11 or so all 20 beds were done and I was sweeping off the porch.  The Parsnip even did the squares for my pea teepees. He was very grouchy about it, and he was not at all pleased about having to do it, but he pressed on anyway. He’s good that way.

Paddy's Green Garden Tilled and ready for Seedlings

At 11:30 he was all done and I was beginning to rake out the clods and making some rows. At 11:45 it started to rain, not hard, but kind of insistent. By 12:30 it was raining too hard to get anything done. So, in a little less than 5 hours we had done what the Parsnip said ¤couldn’t be done. (I never doubted it, so there)  ¤ Note: The Parsnip said after he read my post, “I didn’t say it couldn’t be done, I said it shouldn’t be. See the difference?” It’s whatever.

I have beds to tuck all my babies in…Yay! A place for the peppers. A home for tomatoes. Seedlings, many, many seedlings now have a place to reside.

I think I’m going to hold off another week on the tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers. The melons and cucumbers will go in within the next couple of days though. Peas and beans, radishes and turnips as well. I take a chance with my turnips and radishes, they don’t really “love” to be transplanted, but I am very gentle with them and haven’t lost any yet.

After looking over these pictures, I realized that you can’t tell how much this truly is. This is four beds, each are 6′ in width and approximately 20′ long. Then in the back yard there is one 3′ x 7′ bed and one 3′ x 12′ bed for melons, one 12′ x 15′ bed for peppers and eggplants and one 12′ x 15′ bed for tomatoes.  Oh, yeah, then on each side of the house is a 12′ x 20′ bed, herbs in one, flowers in the other. Five pea plots, five bean plots, wow, I owe my husband a foot rub. Bugger I completely forgot, three 4′ x 20′ cucumber beds. I may have to rub his feet tomorrow too…nah.

To the Garden We'll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

My “secret” to transplanting those crops that set a taproot is not anything scientific or brainy. These are the things that get very “upset” if you try to start them as seedlings and then plant them in your beds. While none of them really enjoy being transplanted and may nod their little heads for a few hours with a little plant, “Oh, just who does she think she is”? kind of attitude.

But there are some, really uptight little guys that actually lose the will to live should you decide they must be moved after you start them. These are the things that need a little careful planning and a big dose of coddling in order to safely transplant them as seedlings.

Squash, including pumpkins, summer or winter varieties fall in to this group, as well as turnips, radishes and parsnips (the veggie, not the hubby. I rarely ever transplant him). Melons and cucumbers are picky about being transplanted, although they won’t usually just die completely, they may put on a very convincing death show before rebounding. Drama queens.

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Joyeux Printemps and Bon Anniversaire, Paul

Joyeux Printemps and Bon Anniversaire, Paul

Firsts have always meant a lot to me. My mother was born on the first day of winter, my brother was born on the first day of spring and I was born on the first day of summer. If it’s the first of any new season, chances are good you need to have a birthday card handy.

It’s the first day of spring, what a way to welcome it in. We had gale force winds, trees are down, electricity is  spotty, and our Wii may have been surged. The Wii is a tragedy because that is how we watch Netflix in the den. I’m hoping it’s just some breaker that Ryan will be able to reset when he gets around to it.

So, it’s spring! Let’s garden!

I’m so excited about my Tom Thumb lettuce. Wait, didn’t you say you don’t grow lettuce? I said I have

Tom Thumb Lettuce Ten Weeks

difficulties with lettuce. I’ve been living in South Texas for the last la di da years and my lettuce has really loved to bolt. I grow romaine for the bunnies and use as much as they don’t eat and this year I’m growing Tom Thumb in the main bed. We’re much further north so it’s not going to bolt, right? Yeah, well, we’ll see. Read the rest of this entry

Ark of Taste

Ark of Taste

Have you heard of the Ark of Taste? If not, now you have.

Maintained by the global Slow Food Movement, the Ark of Taste is a catalog of heritage foods that are in danger of extinction. I love that this is food that is being preserved to use as food.

These fruits and vegetables are not being grown at University, in a Botanical Garden by Master Gardeners for scientists. This is food, being grown for food, by people like you and me. To preserve food because it tastes good! I love that.

When I found out about Slow Food I felt like I had reconnected with an old friend.  It was akin to when I was in the third grade and I found out that we needed to save the pandas. I knocked on every door USNB Beeville, TX. Those pandas were not going to save themselves. I raised $112.67, but it was 1977 so that was like 9 million dollars then, right? Now the panda has a fighting chance. Because of me and the Navy Base in Beeville, TX.

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Paisley Plant of the Week: Winged Asian Bean

Paisley Plant of the Week: Winged Asian Bean

Have I got a paisley plant for you and she’s a beauty! How would you like a plant that you could eat every single part of? A plant low in calories, high in protein and high in flavor? Look no further!

Asian Winged Bean

The Asian Winged Bean has arrived!

Asian Winged Bean plant

Grown much in the way as a pole bean, the carefree vine loads on the beans beginning in September and will continue to be generous right up until your first frost. As I mentioned before, every part of this plant is edible. Not only edible, but delicious. The tuber has a nutty flavor and has up to 20 grams of protein, far more than a potato or even a sweet potato.

The leaves can be eaten fresh, or cooked like spinach. Unlike spinach, they are readily available in even your hottest weeks. The flowers are a beautiful lavender and have the taste and texture of a good mushroom, lovely in salads. And finally the pods, a mixture of a snow pea and asparagus flavor, can be eaten raw, cooked, or they can be dried and cooked like any other dried beans.

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