Category Archives: Vines

Throwback Thursday: White Wonder Cucumber

Throwback Thursday: White Wonder Cucumber

If you have been reading The Paisley Carrot for a while now, you know I’m crazy for cucumbers. If you are just tuning in you should know, I’m crazy for cucumbers. I really love growing cucumbers of any sort, but this year I have a new (to me) variety that is trying to pry top accolades from the tendril grip of the Lemon Cuke.

This brilliant new (to me) garden star is the White Wonder Cucumber. Today it’s the throwback.

White Wonder Cucumber

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Head Count

Head Count

So, I’m still fighting an infection of some sort. Ibuprofen and Goldenseal tea are my two best buds. However,  yesterday evening I got dressed just enough to not shock the neighbors and went to do a quick inspection of the garden. I had decided I may need to make a list of tasks for the Parsnip to do if anyone was in desperate need of anything.

All was quiet on the garden front. Our abundance of rain coupled with warm (okay, hot) weather has left my garden feeling rather smug about herself.

Lemon Cucumber June 2012

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The Summer Is Here!

The Summer Is Here!

Today is the first day of summer! So happy summer! It’s the longest day of the year (or the shortest if you live on the other side of the world).

Summer is…

  • a time for home made and carted popsicles.
  • swimming pools or swimming holes.
  • firefly lanterns and sleep outs.
  • lemonade on the porch and watermelon in the fridge.
  • secrets with friends.
  • daisy chains and banana bikes.
  • pirates and princesses.
  • grandparents and cousins.

It’s the first day. What are you going to do with your summer?

Make it paisley!~KeriAnne

Convincing the Cucumbers and Other Feats of Wonder

Convincing the Cucumbers and Other Feats of Wonder

Today I had to spend the day convincing cucumbers that they are happy in their own neighborhood.

My cucumbers have decided that the manure is better on the other side of the trellis. I pretty much had to take them in hand and convince them that it was all the same poop no matter the side. Some of those boogers actually required twine and a few well placed knots that would not have been sanctioned by the Boy Scouts. Stubborn, to say the least.

Have you ever done this? Today, I’m rockin’ along, minding my own business, pulling grass from around naughty cucumber vines trying to persuade them that they really will be happy in their own little corner of the universe that I have so carefully prepared for them, and whoops, up comes a whole cucumber plant.

Then I spend the next twenty minutes trying to 1) decide if I could possibly re-root it and 2) convince myself that they probably could use a little more room anyway so it’s absolutely fine that I did that horrible thing.

In the end, I composted it, (in not a very cheerful manner). Acknowledge and move on..

Now, to the success of the day. I was getting all my darlings where they needed to be and Jonathan was bringing me one of many, many cups of ice water (15 in all today) he noticed baby cucumbers on the White Wonder plants. I said, “Next week we’ll be awash in cukes, yay!” After he left, I moved a leaf and found this…

White Wonder Cuke on a bed of basil

 

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Throwback Thursday: Is There Anything As Cool As A Cucumber?

Throwback Thursday: Is There Anything As Cool As A Cucumber?

Is there anything as cool as a cucumber?

Cucumbers are just happy plants to grow. They’re so enthusiastic about things. If you have a cool spell, they’re  okay with that. The heat gets turned up, that’s good with them. Rainy spring? They love it.

Really the only thing they may, perhaps, look sideways at you about is if you fail to give them a drink. Cucumbers are lushes, they want a drink. No, they need a drink! But, even with the extreme drought we had last summer, the cucumbers were fine as long as I remembered to water them in the morning and not at night.

Originally from India, cucumbers are now grown on every continent, except Antarctica. (If you live in Antarctica and are growing cucumbers, please let me know) You know after I said that, I’ll bet the scientists in Antarctica do grow cucumbers. Hmmm (Great, now all I can think about is Antarctica)

In case you missed it, I love cucumbers!

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Paisley Plant of the Week: Mexican Sour Gherkins

Paisley Plant of the Week: Mexican Sour Gherkins

This week has been all about the cucumbers.

42 plants, five transplanted the rest seeds, were installed in their heavily composted beds this week. Yesterday was spent re-stringing the A-frame trellis from last year. This trellis is great for cost but time consuming for maintaining. I had to make the netting from scratch this year, as all of last years twine had rotted and would break with the slightest provocation.

It took me about 5 hours working by myself, there are a lot of knots, a lot of knots! Why don’t Girl Scouts learn knots like Boy Scouts do? I’ve had to get my son to come do his fancy knots about a thousand times, he never asks me about self-esteem, making new friends or cookie sales. It’s not fair.

Getting on…

Loads of tiny yellow flowers yield loads of adorable cucumbers.

Mexican Sour Gherkins! They pretty much rock. The plants are small, and really pretty. They very much remind me of English Ivy, but they have fruit. Loads and loads of tiny yellow flowers, followed by a gazillion bumpy, watermelon shaped green globes that are delightfully sweet, crunchy and have a slight lemony brightness. Read the rest of this entry

Paisley Plant of the Week: Vert Grimppant (The Green Climber)

Paisley Plant of the Week: Vert Grimppant (The Green Climber)

I grow many different melons. I really love vine plants in general, I think. This has to be why I seem to gravitate to Morning Glories and cucumbers, squash and, of course, melons.

I didn’t really know this about myself until very recently. We were at coffee with my in-laws and I overheard my hubby say, “If it climbs or vines, she has it.” He was answering a question about whether I grew bush or pole beans, but it made me think about my plant selections in an entirely new way.

I do have a tendency to choose vines and climbers. I’ll have to think for a spell on why that might be, but as of now, it’s just a point to ponder.

Let’s talk melons!

Vert Grimmpant...Lovely!

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Throwback Thursday: Honeysuckle

Throwback Thursday: Honeysuckle

Every time I step outside these days I’m taken aback by the heady smell of the honeysuckle wafting from the woods adjacent our property.

I love the woods by our house for many reasons. 1. They provide a nice barrier from the commercial businesses on the other side.  2. They make a wind break from the strong wind that blows over the lake. 3. They provide shelter for wildlife. 4. They make a sound barrier for the traffic from the highway. 5. They are chock full of the most delicious smelling honeysuckle.

It’s the last bit I’m talking about today.

Japanese Honeysuckle growing in the woods by the house.

Honeysuckle is a shrub Honeysuckle is also a vine. We are lucky enough to have three different kinds of Honeysuckle by the house. I love that at different parts of the day, the smell is different. I can’t help but wonder if the scents are sending different signals. This is not scientific, just the musings of a sensitive nose. ; )

In the morning there is a light, fruity almost citrus smell. About noon, there is a stronger, more wild honey sweet smell. Then, around six, there is the strongest smell of all. This is the intoxicating, permeating, vanilla bourbon yumminess.

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Free Range…Tomatoes?

Free Range…Tomatoes?

I’m not a fan of tomato cages. While they are quite effective at reining your sprawling queens in, they also make the tasks of picking off pests, wilted leaves or sometimes even fruit, laborious. I know I’m in the minority on this matter.

Everyone I know cages their tomatoes. They are perfectly happy with their arrangement. I am perfectly content with mine. It’s just a personal preference on my part.

I’ve taken to using the same fence method that I use for melons, and I’m quite satisfied with it. It is simply straight rows of stakes with chicken wire, hog wire, or whatever wire I have handy at the time, tied to the stakes.

 

 

I plant my tomatoes on both sides of the fence and tie them to the fencing as they grow. In this way I am able to get to the middle of my plants at any given time. I don’t have to wonder if there is fruit somewhere in the middle of that mass of leaves and flowers because I can see clearly to the main stem. Read the rest of this entry