Tag Archives: Harvest

Paisley Plant of the Week: Bonus Corn

Paisley Plant of the Week: Bonus Corn

This plant is so paisley…it’s dripping paisley!

Corn.

Sounds boring, right? Not so!

Bonus Corn!

Bonus corn is a hybrid that produces those little corns that are so delicious in stir-fry. Each ear is 4-6 inches long and the entire ear is edible, no need to slice it off of the cob. My wise son just told me to tell you, you do still have to peel it. He was worried you might try to eat it peel and all. Thanks Jonners.

Growing Bonus corn is also fun. It emerges quickly. I chit mine, but it probably isn’t necessary. I just got in the habit of doing the corn along with my beans and peas. It may give me a little jump on my seeds, I dunno.

Bonus corn grows to a height of 5′. Here’s something different (and paisley) about Bonus corn, each stalk produces 4-5 ears! That’s cool. I also grow Country Gentleman, a standard shoepeg variety, you only get one ear per stalk with that. So 4-5 little ears are super cool, and paisley!

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5 Reasons to Buy Local or the Paisley Soapbox, You Choose

5 Reasons to Buy Local or the Paisley Soapbox, You Choose

Keep it in the Community

I am not a zealot in the organic arena. I will not be raking any muck. There are many people that fill this niche with the passion that is necessary to get the job done.

I love to garden and I want it to be as fun and stress free as possible. That being said, I don’t use chemicals in the garden and I don’t buy processed food. I think GMO’s should be clearly labeled and, while I am not against antibiotics if the infection warrants it, I don’t want them in my food in any form.

And that’s the end of my muckraking career. Now I’m going to tell you the reasons I think you should garden organically and buy local organic produce. That’s what you wanted to know today, right? You thought when you got up, “I think I’ll take a jog before church tonight, and, oh yeah, I wonder why that Paisley woman thinks I should buy local”?

Local is Best

Okay, so probably not. Here goes anyway.

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A Tale of Two Critters

A Tale of Two Critters

They are the best of critters, they are the worst of critters.

I’m guilty. I am one of those people that think bunnies and deer are cute. Squirrels are adorable and foxes are precocious and clever. Birds are beautiful, bold and brash.

Oh how sweet...NOT!

Just adorable? I don't think so!

In the garden and hen yard, it’s an entirely different story. When you realize that these uninvited visitors are the cause of your poor yields, you get a reality check. Bunnies and deer are a detriment. Foxes and squirrels, savages to bulbs and chickens, and birds…must…be…BANISHED!

Some of this attitude stems from the fact that until quite recently, I have always lived pretty much in the middle of major cities. My gardens had a few unwanted visitors, armadillo, groundhogs and the occasional nuisance crow. Nothing like what I have now which is sixteen distinct beds, seven that back up to a heavily wooded area. Let’s just say I’ve put on my “critter beware” hat and I mean business.

You worked for those veggies! He's eating them.

So, what am I doing to stop the veggie carnage? My approach has a threefold structure. One, deter with some pretty low tech methods. Two, deter with a few things the garden uses anyway. And finally, break out the secret weapon.

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Lucky Clover, and Other Green Manure

Lucky Clover, and Other Green Manure

Happy Leap Day! Don’t you feel lucky to have been given another? Luck always makes me think of clover, four leafed of course. Clover makes me think of...leprechauns?…Ireland?…nope. Manure. Green Manure of course.

I’ve only scratched the surface of the Green Manure issue. I’ve used just one of the myriad of cover crops. Only the Red Clover. You may be asking, “Why? Why have you not taken advantage of a centuries tested approach to extending the fertility and productivity of our growing spaces?” The answer would be one word. Ignorance.

I simply do not know enough about cover crops to warrant sewing my gardens with fava beans or Buckwheat every year. It seems to me that cover crops may be a farmer’s tool not as much a gardener’s tool.

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A Time to Reap. A Time to Sow. Timing is Key!

A Time to Reap. A Time to Sow. Timing is Key!

“If you fail to plan, then you plan to fail.”

“A plan is a list of actions arranged in whatever sequence is thought likely to achieve an objective.”

“Always plan ahead. It wasn’t raining outside when Noah built the Ark.”

We’ve heard it all before. We must make a plan. Planning is good.

I must say though, in gardening, plans can change. This is sticky for me. I’m not obsessive as to be diagnosed as such, but I have tendencies. You know, I’m the kind of person that makes a list of the lists she needs to make. The kind of person that when she realizes she has left it off of the list, writes it in to cross it off. Yep. I’m that girl.

At this point you either, know me, hate me, or are me. I completely understand all three of these. I know…that meticulous planning helps me feel in control when there is no way to completely be in control. I hate…that I make myself and my immediate family crazy obsessing about seemingly inconsequential details. I am…aware that is just how I am and I, and my immediately family, are just going to have to deal with it.

As this is not a post about psychological awareness per se , let’s get to the garden.

There are certain gardening schedules that we really must be very strict about in order to get a good result. On the other hand, there are some things that we can loosen up about without adversely effecting our outcome or ruining our lives. As with most things in life, it seems we must do our best to prepare for an outcome, then adapt and overcome if it all goes pear shaped. It’s the ballet of the garden.

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