Tag Archives: plant food

Comfrey, and the Livin’ is Good!

Comfrey, and the Livin’ is Good!

In a rather neglected part of the yard, over by the treeline of the woods, I have three Comfrey plants that seem to like their arrangement. I like them there as well. They have pretty lavender and white flowers and they will come back next year even though I’ll cut them down to two inches this year.

As a Green Manure, Comfrey is a workhorse. As a natural fertilizer, it will be your “go to” plant food. You may even come to depend on it as you do your Aloe or lavender. This hardworking, often overlooked plant can really do wonders in the garden, and in the home.

I grow Comfrey for three purposes: compost, herbal medicinal, and as a nice border.

 

Comfrey Border by the woods.

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Testing…Testing…One, Two, Three…Four!

Testing…Testing…One, Two, Three…Four!

Without me, the garden has continued to do it’s thing. I’ve been stuck in the house with my stupid back this last week, but the garden has managed without me. I’ve been sending Jonathan out to do some things, move the sprinklers, fix the trellis, check things over, but I’m more than ready to see everything for myself.

Today I can walk unassisted and I’ve been up for three hours without pain medication, so I’m thinking I’ll be outside for at least a little while later on. Ryan threatened me before he went to work. “If I even see you with a hoe in your hands, I’m telling dad.” He needn’t have bothered. The pain this last week was sufficient a lesson, the “real” work will be done by the boys from now on.

So, what am I going to do? Thanks for asking. Today is testing day. I have a bunch of things that will be ready in the next little bit to go from their juvenile containers to the garden. I’m making sure their new beds are ready for them with the nutrients and pH conditions they’ll need.

This is the kit before testing.

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One Fish, Two Fish, Feed Your Plants Fish

One Fish, Two Fish, Feed Your Plants Fish

4 out of 5 colonists agree that planting your corn on top of a fish results in better yields.

It’s no “fish story” that the colonists learned from the Native Americans to plant their corn crops with a fish. They didn’t know why it worked, but they knew that it did.

Today, we can understand that the decay of the fish provides a nitrogen rich environment for plants, and that nitrogen is essential for leaf growth and that leaf growth is essential for plant health. Corn needs plentiful amounts of ┬ánitrogen throughout it’s entire growth cycle. This makes perfect sense when you consider a kernel the size of pea will end up being six foot tall and produce hundreds of seeds.

I use a combination of a few fish based fertilizers with results that keep me content.

It's like Magic from the Sea

I use Sea Magic on everything for many reasons.

  1. It’s inexpensive. Generally under $5 per packet each packet makes 60 gallons. That’s pretty inexpensive.
  2. You make a “tea” with it then use the “tea” as a water supplement when you want to feed.
  3. I have never had a problem with “burning” plants, even the tiniest of seedlings when I use my kelp tea.
  4. Plants love it! The proof is in the pudding. Healthy plants, huge yields and gorgeous fruits and veggies.

Sea Magic "tea" ready to go.

Stuff You Missed in Botany: Leaves

Stuff You Missed in Botany: Leaves

Leaves are such fun! We love to see them stretch themselves in our little peat pots in the early spring. We love to see them set themselves ablaze in the dog days of summer and the proclamation of fall. We take treks to behold the wonder that are leaves.

So, what are they? How can we help them be healthy in our gardens?

Leaves are the organs of photosynthesis, typically flattened and thin. Although some leaves have adapted to be quite unrecognizable as a leaf in the way we think of leaves. The leaves of conifers are those needles you pull out of your carpet for six months after Christmas. The leaves of succulents are fat and juicy, sometimes waxy or pokey. (Pokey is a technical term, don’t try this at home)

Leaves come in a gazillion shapes, sizes and colors. Like people. (Gazillion, another technical term) = )

Leaves in my garden are the indicators of health for my plants. If they’re perky, green and abundant, life is good. Proceed with gusto. If they’re droopy, sallow and sketchy, an intervention of some sort is necessary. Proceed with caution. If they are rotted, brown and chewed on, well, it may be time for a new hobby or at least some new plants. Proceed to the seed catalog or knitting store, whichever seems logical at the time.

Leaves perform the duties of changing the energy in sunlight chemically into a form of energy or food for the plant. Think of them as tiny little powerhouses. They arrange themselves in such a way that they get the most amount of sunlight they can without shading their brother and sister leaves. If you’re even half observant in your garden you’ll see leaves turn themselves towards the radiance of the sun. It’s amazing.

Cucumber stretching to the sun!

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