Tag Archives: Seeds

Are You Plugged In?

Are You Plugged In?

Today I had to update plugins. Not an unusual or exciting occasion. Certainly not worth writing about. However, it did cause me to look particularly long at the word plugin and realize, it’s not a word.

I mean, it is a word, spell check doesn’t even blink at it. But really, plugin, is not a word. It’s like the h in humble, we never voted to change it to umble, but somehow, that’s what it is. (Except at my house, where the h gets used each and every time it is meant to be used. I mean,  arry the enderson as a pulled amstring makes you sound like you’re doing a bad cockney impression. Dun’t it?)

All that to say this, today is shameless plug day! Here’s what I read, what I love, what I’m thinking about. I know you wanted to know. If you love them as well, tell them the Paisley Carrot sent you. I’m giving you four from each category because four is my favorite number. Read the rest of this entry

To the Garden We’ll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

To the Garden We’ll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

The beds are in…the beds are in! 20 beds all tucked in, one Parsnip, all tuckered out!

This is the before picture of the front four beds.

Today was the first day schedules meshed with the Parsnip, my Father-in-law and his tiller.

It could not have been more perfect. Around seven the Parsnip started tilling the two beds that will have flowers around the driveway. By 11 or so all 20 beds were done and I was sweeping off the porch.  The Parsnip even did the squares for my pea teepees. He was very grouchy about it, and he was not at all pleased about having to do it, but he pressed on anyway. He’s good that way.

Paddy's Green Garden Tilled and ready for Seedlings

At 11:30 he was all done and I was beginning to rake out the clods and making some rows. At 11:45 it started to rain, not hard, but kind of insistent. By 12:30 it was raining too hard to get anything done. So, in a little less than 5 hours we had done what the Parsnip said ¤couldn’t be done. (I never doubted it, so there)  ¤ Note: The Parsnip said after he read my post, “I didn’t say it couldn’t be done, I said it shouldn’t be. See the difference?” It’s whatever.

I have beds to tuck all my babies in…Yay! A place for the peppers. A home for tomatoes. Seedlings, many, many seedlings now have a place to reside.

I think I’m going to hold off another week on the tomatoes, eggplants, and peppers. The melons and cucumbers will go in within the next couple of days though. Peas and beans, radishes and turnips as well. I take a chance with my turnips and radishes, they don’t really “love” to be transplanted, but I am very gentle with them and haven’t lost any yet.

After looking over these pictures, I realized that you can’t tell how much this truly is. This is four beds, each are 6′ in width and approximately 20′ long. Then in the back yard there is one 3′ x 7′ bed and one 3′ x 12′ bed for melons, one 12′ x 15′ bed for peppers and eggplants and one 12′ x 15′ bed for tomatoes.  Oh, yeah, then on each side of the house is a 12′ x 20′ bed, herbs in one, flowers in the other. Five pea plots, five bean plots, wow, I owe my husband a foot rub. Bugger I completely forgot, three 4′ x 20′ cucumber beds. I may have to rub his feet tomorrow too…nah.

To the Garden We'll Be Going, To Do Some Raking and Some Hoeing

My “secret” to transplanting those crops that set a taproot is not anything scientific or brainy. These are the things that get very “upset” if you try to start them as seedlings and then plant them in your beds. While none of them really enjoy being transplanted and may nod their little heads for a few hours with a little plant, “Oh, just who does she think she is”? kind of attitude.

But there are some, really uptight little guys that actually lose the will to live should you decide they must be moved after you start them. These are the things that need a little careful planning and a big dose of coddling in order to safely transplant them as seedlings.

Squash, including pumpkins, summer or winter varieties fall in to this group, as well as turnips, radishes and parsnips (the veggie, not the hubby. I rarely ever transplant him). Melons and cucumbers are picky about being transplanted, although they won’t usually just die completely, they may put on a very convincing death show before rebounding. Drama queens.

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Winnie-the-Pooh Garden

Winnie-the-Pooh Garden

One of my favorite memories from when my kids were little, is reading aloud to them Winnie-the-Pooh. I tried to time it just right so that on their sixth birthday we would begin, Now We Are Six. So, usually around four we would start with When We Were Very Young. We would read a little Pooh and then whatever else they had chosen, Amelia Bedelia or Incredible Ned or whatever the flavor of the day happened to be. But we would start and end with a chapter of Milne.

There is wisdom to be found in these little books. Only scratch the surface to find a treasure trove of ideologically solid principles on which to hang your hat.

Why not start a new tradition this year. Read the books and grow a garden! You could make a Hundred Acre Wood sign and off you could go. Here’s the ideas I had after just a little thought.

I’m thinking a garden in seven sections or rows.: Pooh (of course), Piglet, Rabbit, Eeyore, and Tigger, Christopher Robin and Roo.

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Paisley Plant of the Week: Winged Asian Bean

Paisley Plant of the Week: Winged Asian Bean

Have I got a paisley plant for you and she’s a beauty! How would you like a plant that you could eat every single part of? A plant low in calories, high in protein and high in flavor? Look no further!

Asian Winged Bean

The Asian Winged Bean has arrived!

Asian Winged Bean plant

Grown much in the way as a pole bean, the carefree vine loads on the beans beginning in September and will continue to be generous right up until your first frost. As I mentioned before, every part of this plant is edible. Not only edible, but delicious. The tuber has a nutty flavor and has up to 20 grams of protein, far more than a potato or even a sweet potato.

The leaves can be eaten fresh, or cooked like spinach. Unlike spinach, they are readily available in even your hottest weeks. The flowers are a beautiful lavender and have the taste and texture of a good mushroom, lovely in salads. And finally the pods, a mixture of a snow pea and asparagus flavor, can be eaten raw, cooked, or they can be dried and cooked like any other dried beans.

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Stuff You Missed in Botany: Germination

Stuff You Missed in Botany: Germination

One of my favorite Podcasts is Stuff You Missed History Class. I thought it might be enjoyable use this format to talk about stuff in Botany that will help gardeners.

With everyone getting their seed packets out, I think it’s a good time to talk about germination. Learning about seeds can help you increase your germination rates, helping you get more plants to yield each year. We all want that, right?

For the most part, a seed is very much like a chicken egg. They have a shell, or seed coat, an embryo that is a baby plant, and a food source, called cotyledons.

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Seeds! Glorious Seeds!

Seeds! Glorious Seeds!

The seeds are beginning to arrive.  The garden plan is drawn. This years plant selection has been chosen for some time now. Some seeds were saved from last year, others have been purchased and are now beginning to arrive.

I have been so excited it’s ridiculous. You know the kind of excited where you can’t sleep and you can’t sit still and all you can think about is (insert obsession here)? That’s how I’ve been about these seeds.

Why? For me, it’s all about the possibilities. When I knit or crochet one of my favorite things is picking the patterns. It’s the same with everything I do. Recipes are beautiful, lesson plans divine, don’t get me started on fabric!

The seeds are safe in their warm dry paper packets with the brightly colored illustrations of the mature plants they are meant to become. The possibilities boggle the mind. For me it’s not just the possibility of the seedlings or even the plants, it goes far beyond these. My thoughts go to the pickles I’ll put up, the salsa I’ll create, the tabasco sauce I’ll attempt to make again this year, the soap I’ll make with the lavender oil, the pesto I’ll give as Christmas presents, Rosemary pizza dough…and so on…and so on…ad infinitum. It’s all of this and so much more!